Musings from Mars Banner Image
For Software Addicts: Yes!MaybeNah!
News Posts In Category <em>   Misreporting</em>

News Posts In Category Misreporting

September 1st, 2012

Apple v. Samsung: The True Story

Apple v. Samsung. Everyone who thinks Samsung got shafted and/or that the decision was wrong should read this excellent article. It's not an opinion piece, by the way: It's full of actual facts about various patent cases and about the Samsung decisionmaking that the jury was presented with. Clearly, Samsung made a conscious choice to copy the iPhone, and they succeeded. Wildly. Apple was right to take them to court to protect their intellectual property rights, and the jury was right to decide in their favor. If you're on the fence about the decision, this one will definitely tip you over to Apple's side.
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
August 12th, 2008

Phishing and Safari (Part 2): A Sheep in Wolf’s Clothing

Consumer Reports urges Mac users to dump Safari, cites lack of phishing protection

And to think I used to like Consumer Reports!

They keep writing me to "come back" and resubscribe, but I've told them that won't happen until they become objective and truly knowledgeable about the Mac... at least as knowledgeable as they are about Windows PCs.

And now, it turns out they're recommending that Mac users "dump Safari," which just happens to be the best web browser on the Mac platform. Oh, and since this article also appears on ZDNet, while other industry journals gave it little play, I begin to conclude that ZDNet is a rats nest of Microsoft zealots.

So, here's the little note I left them today about their latest phishing/Safari scare tactic:

There is nothing in common between phishing and viruses, adware, spyware, or other malware. Phishing is just an old-fashioned scam dressed up in new HTML clothing. Consumers need to be educated about it, and no anti-phishing technology is going to save them. For one thing, most phishing schemes come to consumers through their email client, not their browsers.

Oh, and 6 or 7 years ago, why didn't Consumer Reports advise Windows users to ditch IE? That would have been the single best way for them to avoid Internet malware, but I never heard them do such a thing. The phishing problem pales in comparison to the security nightmares we experienced after IE6 was released (and before SP2), and which millions of Windows users continue to experience today. Active/X is the most dangerous technology out there as far as security is concerned, but is MS being pressured to remove it from IE?

Unfortunately, I don't think we've heard the last of this... At least, until Apple goes ahead and joins the other browsers in adding "anti-phishing technology" to Safari. Like I noted above, it really makes a lot more sense to add this capability to users' mail clients, since phishing is just a form of junk mail in the end.

    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
August 12th, 2008

Phishing and Safari (Part 1): A Sheep in Wolf’s Clothing

ZDNet: iPhone vulnerable to phishing, spamming flaws

There has lately been a rash of articles about how "insecure" Safari is because it has no anti-phishing mechanism. Frankly, I think this is a bunch of hogwash. It's an attempt to show how lax Apple is about security, and, by implication, how great Microsoft is.

It's not that I don't think phishing is a serious problem... I do! It's just that phishing is not a security issue, which is how the anti-Apple, pro-Microsoft (and pro-Firefox) zealots are trying to portray it.

Here's the comment I left on ZDNet's site about this article, dated 7/23/08:

Phishing scams are very bad, but they are not the same as viruses or malware that gets installed on your operating system. Not even in the same category. They are simply a sophisticated con, and unfortunately there are a lot of naive, clueless web users who will click on any link they're offered. Then again, I know people who are so paranoid they won't click on any link in an email at all... even if it comes from a trusted source (like a friend). I'm not at all convinced that anti-phishing software will work any better than junk-mail filters have, though I understand the need to try.

All you guys who are so hot to jump on Apple need to at least know what you're talking about. Though the companies who make money on security vulnerabilities like to lump phishing in with "security" flaws, in my opinion they aren't. Why? Because they pose no threat to the integrity of your computer or to your network.

Later, in reply to a reader who thought I was kidding with this opinion, I wrote:

Of course it's bothersome... on the same plane as the scum who trick old ladies out of their social security checks by conning them into some phony investment.

Phishing is more insidious, but if you have an ounce of common sense, it's easily avoided.

Not so with viruses and spyware, which can invade your system without any action on your part... not even clicking on a link. If following a link loads a virus, that's not phishing, defined as [blockquote] the activity of defrauding an online account holder of financial information by posing as a legitimate company[/blockquote].

My point is, phishing is not so much a security liability as it is a privacy issue... Phishing amounts to identity theft.

I'm not arguing that phishing isn't a serious concern that needs to be addressed. But I'm saying it's not a security issues in that it doesn't install software on your system, invade your network, or propagate itself to others.

I am arguing that it's more like spam, which is likewise a serious problem that can lead individuals to dangerous websites or tempt them into bad decisions. Like spam, I'm doubtful that any software solution to eradicate phishing is possible.

In this light, the urgency to correct a phishing vulnerability is much lower than that to correct a security vulnerability, and the fact that such a vulnerability exists should not alarm users to the same degree.

Turns out this "phishing" scam isn't over with the iPhone or Safari. See more of my ranting in Part 2 of this topic.

    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
July 22nd, 2007

Microsoft Junkies Spreading “Apple Messed Up The iPhone” FUD

Windows Mobile needs fixing, fast | InfoWorld | Column | 2007-07-18 | By Oliver Rist

I was so incensed by this posting at InfoWorld, which builds on an earlier one by respected InfoWorld Test Center lead Tom Yager, that I dashed off the following email to InfoWorld, canceling my print subscription and putting a stop to all of their RSS feeds. From what I can see through my 18-year-old son's eyes (we got him an iPhone as a high school graduation present), Apple has hit a bulls-eye with this gadget. Playing with it myself for a few minutes, this cellphone, Palm Pilot, and Blackberry resister suddenly understood the appeal of such devices. You really have to try the iPhone interface to appreciate how amazing and revolutionary it is. Clearly, this Oliver Rist creep is more interested in pushing Microsoft technology than in assessing the relative merits of whatever technologies exist. It's reminiscent of the way guys like this tried to talk the iPod into a hole 6 years ago, and given their dramatic failure at that attempt, this anti-iPhone talk would be sad if it weren't so creepy.

I've sadly watched InfoWorld go slowly downhill in the last year, as its IT coverage moved more and more mainstream and less honest. By "mainstream," I mean coverage that pays homage to where its advertising dollars come from rather than to integrity ("honest journalism") and the needs of its readership.

After having been mostly a fan of Tom Yager in recent years, I was appalled at the sensational slant of his article on the iPhone, "iPhone: The $1,975 iPod." That article was of course widely quoted and utilized by others at InfoWorld who it seems are determined to talk the device down. Apple has made clear that it isn't a business device (heck, it doesn't even offer business accounts!)... it's a consumer device. And a good many of Yager's "cons" are based on unreasonable assumptions of performance that neither Apple nor any other "smartphone" provider aim for.

All that has done is made idiots who think everything IT should be for business first and people later mad. Today I got this garbage in my inbox:

WHAT GIVES WINDOWS MOBILE EDGE OVER IPHONE

Columnist's corner: Even though Apple messed up the iPhone, Oliver Rist writes, "much of the device's problems aren't technical, but just bad business." Not so for Windows Mobile, which is plagued by troubled technology, including ActiveSync issues, Wi-Fi woes, application incompatibility, and worse, its very own Blue Screen of Death. "Microsoft has all the advantages that count in this space right now," Rist adds in Windows Mobile needs fixing fast. "The company really has the chance to win one based on functionality and capability rather than just marketing." The news beat: Sources say that a beta of Vista SP1 is... ...

More of this blog:

The InfoWorld writer who wrote this also calls consumer who buy Apple products "iSheep," saying they're the type who "need an Apple logo tattooed on as many of their belongings as possible." This is a guy who probably never understood the appeal of the iPod, either. Heaven forbid that he'd see the virtue of a Mac. And he's determined to do Microsoft's bidding by spreading FUD about the iPhone while it's still in its infancy. This is honest journalism? He bases his lead premise that "Apple messed up the iPhone" on Tom Yager's own piece of crap.

I don't know if Yager chose his article's headline or not... oddly, it doesn't seem like his style to me. Because it's the headline that made me not want to read the rest of whatever garbage he was peddling in that article. My teenager has an iPhone (high school graduation gift), and I figure I'll form my own impression of it by hands-on use [Update: I've now done this... see intro]. I really don't know how anyone can form a valid impression of a device like the iPhone in the few days Yager had before spouting off. Yes, I was disappointed with the arrangement with AT&T, too, and the requirement to buy a plan will keep me from buying an iPhone--at least in the short-term. But I seriously doubt that this requirement defeats the obvious genius of the device itself, as the headline asserts. After all, in my opinion the whole cellular industry is built on greed... nothing comes for free in that market, that I can tell. Yet I'm sure the FCC required Apple to establish a relationship with one of the existing carriers if they wanted to offer such services in the iPhone.

Not only does Yager's headline make the deal sound outlandishly expensive, it also gives AT&T equal billing with Apple as the device's creator in the subtitle. I've never owned a cellular phone... I still don't see how it could possibly be worth spending so much a month in order to be constantly available... but my wife and son are heavy users. My wife's plan is paid for by her employer, or she wouldn't have one either. But we pay a monthly fee for my son's plan... which was a Cigna plan at about $30 a month. The plan had no data or SMTP and very limited call options. That would be $720 for 2 years. His phone has no web connectivity, no bluetooth, no video, no email, and no music options.

With the iPhone, he not only gets an incredibly cool device with a revolutionary interface, but he also gets web, bluetooth, video, music, email, and potentially much more over time. With a 2-year plan, this will cost $1,440, and he'll be getting unlimited data services, some limited text messaging, video email, and all the wireless capabilities as well. I mean, to me, this sounds like a great deal to anyone who can afford it, and you can't measure the value of actually being able to use the device for those functions rather than fiddling with unworkable wands or teeny thumbpads.

So at the most, Yager and other idiotic price critics who just don't get it could argue that the iPhone is $500 over 2 years. Given what it offers in terms of functionality and ease of use, I really doubt that your average consumer, who doesn't have Microsoft or its XMinions whispering in their ear, is going to think that's very expensive. After all, given what my son has said, he plans to replace his current 60GB iPod with this 8GB iPhone. I was surprised he could make do with such a small capacity, but he seems to think the device's other virtues make it well worthwhile.

And this is just the first model iPhone... remember what the previous such idiots said about the first iPod's price? Sheesh.

I wanted you to know that I'm canceling my RSS feeds and will not be renewing my print subscription.

Regards,
Leland Scott

    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
May 1st, 2007

Ars Technica Predicts Microsoft’s Silverlight Will Kill Flash


Microsoft’s Flash-killer Silverlight steals the show at MIX07

Ars Technica had better can some of these guys who have become blatant cheerleaders for Microsoft, or they’re going to start losing readers. In response to this biased piece on Microsoft’s new Silverlight technology, which is specifically designed to compete with Flex, Apollo, and Flash, I left this little message as a comment:

Regardless of how good or bad Microsoft’s version of Flash (or Ajax, or JPEG, or MPEG, or PDF, or you name it) may be, the fact is that Microsoft has a monopoly on corporate desktops, one that it won illegally by the way but has never been brought to task for. Its technologies should be avoided entirely unless you really want to see Microsoft extend them to the entire range of computing environments eventually.

In other words, unless you really want competition and innovation in computing to grind to a halt, you should always look for alternatives to whatever Microsoft is selling. And please avoid playing Microsoft cheerleader in a serious technology journal like Ars Technica would like to be. The point is, new Microsoft standards aren’t necessary… we have plenty of good ones already. Every time Microsoft comes along with another of its proprietary versions of existing standards, it only serves to confuse the market and slow the adoption and use of web technologies. Look at what happened when they crushed Netscape in the late 1990’s… it’s taken 10 years to recover from that, so that we’re finally seeing the kinds of web interfaces I, for one, was ready to deliver in 1998.

Not only that, but each Microsoft technology takes up mindshare that squeezes out genuinely innovative ideas from much smaller, potential competitors. And small companies, as everybody who’s taken Econ 101 knows, is where innovation occurs in this economy. Every time Microsoft buys up a small company with a good idea (think: Vermeer and FrontPage), it ruins a tool that could be really useful (it didn’t take long for FrontPage to turn the web into a bunch of pages that didn’t work in non-IE browsers, or non-Windows platforms, for example, by injecting Active/X controls and proprietary IE tags into the pages it created… the same is true of every MS development tool, for that matter).

If you’re really in favor of open competition in our economy, you’d never select a Microsoft product as the basis for anything. If they didn’t already own the desktop, it would be different. Since they do, they need to be simply ignored in technologies they don’t already own. Remember, regardless of what their sometimes sympathetic spokespoeple may say, Microsoft’s entire product line is designed to extend the Windows platform as far as possible. That’s it.

I think a lot of people believe it’s extended far enough already, thanks. If you agree, just say no to Microsoft’s latest candy. That includes you, Microsoft apologists who write for Ars Technica.

    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
March 3rd, 2007

Spread The Word: Al Gore Used Keynote For “Inconvenient Truth”… NOT PP

CNet says Oscar-winning "An Inconvenient Truth" made in Powerpoint. Can you say FACT CHECK! Les Posen gives the facts to a bunch of dimwitted reporters who probably never heard of Keynote... They reported that Al Gore used PowerPoint in making his Oscar-winning documentary, "An Inconvenient Truth," without even bothering to check the facts. Probably made the PC-prejudiced assumption that since they use PowerPoint, everyone does. Ah, the casual abuses of the majority.
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
September 24th, 2006

John Gruber on Apple’s New AirPort Security Update

Daring Fireball: The AirPort Security Update and the Supposed MacBook Wi-Fi Hack I've been wondering about this, and I'm sure I'll enjoy reading Gruber's take on it.
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
September 24th, 2006

Laughing at Negative Prognostication About Apple

David Pogue: When Apple Hit Bottom From his New York Times blog, Pogue takes us to memory lane and revisits all the silly---and often downright malicious---forecasts about Apple's demises in various markets. All of which have proven wrong, of course. Can you say Fear, Uncertainty, Doubt? This kind of forecasting is the cream of the crop of anti-Apple FUD from the past.
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
September 7th, 2006

Is Apple Being Unfairly Targeted on Environmental Issues?

More Secrets: The Scandal of Green Computing In another pointed commentary with a number of disturbing facts on this issue, RoughlyDrafted's Dan Eran makes the case that it is.  He specifically calls out Greenpeace and the California organization Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition (SVTC) for unfairly fingering Apple, when in fact the company has been doing a much better job of adhering to environmental laws than companies like Dell and HP, which Greenpeace and SVTC rate more highly.  He points out that though Apple was late to the free recycling game, that's partly because (a) the number of Apple computers being trashed was tiny compared with those of Windows PCs, and (b) that's because Apples typically last much longer and are retained and recycled by their owners rather than being trashed unceremoniously.  Further, he claims that the iPod is far more environmentally friendly than previous such products and is being unfairly picked on, partly because of Apple's refusal to "buy" support from the critical groups by making requested contributions.  All in all, an unsettling but illuminating article.
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
August 30th, 2006

SecureWorks admits to falsifying MacBook wireless hack - The Unofficial Apple Weblog (TUAW)

TUAW: SecureWorks admits to falsifying MacBook wireless hack This news came out while I was at the beach... but I wanted to be sure to capture it in my bookmarks. Great summary by TUAW blogger David Chartier. For even more detailed coverage of this anti-Apple episode, see John Gruber's 8/21 article on the subject.
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
August 3rd, 2006

Cracked MacBook: Gleeful PC Zealots Once Again Try To Put Mac OS X Down

MacSlash: Gone In 60 Seconds The story about the MacBook that was compromised has been making the rounds the last day or so, supposedly pointing out a security flaw in Apple's Airport (wi-fi) implementation. On closer inspection, the flaw originated with a 3rd party wi-fi add-on, and had nothing to do with Apple or Mac OS X. I'm only documenting this incident for future reference.
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
July 23rd, 2006

Apple Market Share Myths Exposed!

RoughlyDrafted: Market Share Myth: Nailed! This is part 2 of Daniel Eran's analysis of the origins, causes, and erroneous assumptions behind the myth of the incredibly low Apple Mac market share. Eran also looks at how market share numbers are fooled with in talking about the iPod and its market share.
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
July 23rd, 2006

The Apple Market Share Myth

RoughlyDrafted Takes On The Apple Market Share Myth I'm delighted to see Daniel Eran of RoughlyDrafted take on this myth, which is so insidious. Like many statistics, market share numbers can be conjured in many different ways to try to make your point. Unscrupulous Apple FUDders invariably pick the lowest possible variant of market share to make their point that Apple is worthless and Mac users insignificant. But it just ain't so...
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
June 28th, 2006

MuseStorm Desktop A Flop in Safari

Build Your Own Ajax Desktop! Yippee! If only it were that easy... or actually, if only when you were done you had something worth using! The developer makes too many exaggerated claims for me. First, he promises "The homepage we will create will have most of the capabilities of established homepages like Netvibes, PageFlakes, etc." That's simply bull**it. I ignore PageFlakes because it ignores me, but Netvibes is light years beyond what this tutorial gets you. Then the developer says the MuseStorm "SDK" supports Safari. But he clearly hasn't tried this desktop in Safari! Netvibes works beautifully in all browsers, has far more capabilities, and is nicer looking to boot. I realize this is only a tutorial, but that's not what he leads you to believe. I guess I'll have to add MuseStorm to the list of Ajax developer toolkits... it'll be interesting to see how the rest of the product fares. The desktop is a big FLOP. (By the way, this was linked again from Max Kiesler's mHub, his blog listing cool new Ajax applications. Max obviously doesn't do very much testing before recommending these things, since this is hardly the first time I've been led astray by one of his links.)
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
June 26th, 2006

Apple & Open Source… Strange Buffaloes?

Daniel Eran: Apple & Open Source... Strange Buffaloes? Here's the latest in Daniel Eran's attack on the tech writers who've beaten a non-story about Apple's Intel kernel into the ground. Here, he takes issue with a couple of points John Gruber made in his response to Tim Bray's bemoaning Apple's lack of open-source initiatives.
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
Posted in:Apple, Misreporting, |
June 17th, 2006

The ‘Mac OS X Closed by Pirates’ Myth

Roughly Drafted: The 'Mac OS X Closed by Pirates' Myth Here's a counterattack to the rash of articles last week accusing Apple of abandoning open source in the course of converting to Intel chips.
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
June 16th, 2006

MacDailyNews Doesn’t Mourn Bill Gates (Neither Do I)

MacDailyNews | Requiem for Bill Gates MacDailyNews reports on a typical news article about Bill Gates' "stepping down" from Microsoft, this one by Jeff Jarvis in the Guardian. It's a great mix of the reported news and astute observation... for example, that Jarvis, who lauds Gates as the "best businessman ever born", has a son whose website proclaims he is a huge Mac addict, not the Gates worshipper his Dad claims. And I'm glad to see MDN take Jarvis down for that "best businessman" crap... Gates was ruthless and very, very lucky. Business skills had little to do with it. Rather, it was luck, lying, and cheating. If lying and cheating are considered essential business skills these days, then we're teaching our kids the wrong lessons here, folks.
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
June 10th, 2006

Video Shows John Dvorak Explaining How He Lies To Get Hits

MacDailyNews Video: Dvorak admits to baiting Mac users for hits Folks, don't let your kids grow up thinking this is a valid avenue to success, please. Just because someone is successful in America doesn't make them good or right, yet that's clearly part of our culture. If you want proof that success is not a sign of "doing something right", this is it. So the next time you are tempted to say about Bill Gates and Microsoft, for example, "Well, they captured 95% of the world's PC desktops, so they must be doing something right," bite your tongue. And for heavens sake, just ignore John Dvorak from now on.
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
June 1st, 2006

Trying To Debunk The “Mac Is More Expensive” Myth

Gene Steinberg: Perpetuation The Myth of Expensive Macs Here's a short but sweet attempt to put down the continued myth that Macs are more expensive than PCs. Some people just won't believe it, and they keep making up irrelevant arguments to prove their point. Why? Are they mad because they didn't buy a Mac originally? Why does the truth hurt so much?
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
May 26th, 2006

Thorough Analysis of Five Mac Myths Related to Security

Mac360: Macs And Viruses. Fact vs. FUD. From Mac360, this is a two-part article addressing five myths the authors identify that have become common regarding the Mac and Windows Viruses:
  1. Macs are just as vulnerable to Viruses, Worms, and Trojans as Windows computers.
  2. Macs using Intel Processors are more vulnerable now because they use the same processors found in generic PCs.
  3. Mac vulnerabilities have increased 228% since 2003, but Windows vulnerabilities have increased a much smaller amount. That means the Mac is MORE vulnerable than Windows!
  4. Now that Macs are getting more popular, aren’t virus writers going to start attacking the Mac more?
  5. Mac users now have to purchase and run Anti-virus software, install firewalls and scan their computers for spyware the same as Windows users.
Good list of myths! I haven't read their analysis yet, but they're off to a great start!
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
May 17th, 2006

More on Microsoft’s “Big Lies”: A Tale of Two Press Releases

Consortiuminfo.org - A Tale of Two Press Releases: Big Lies and Objective Journalism This is a sequel to the author's first article on this subject. This second article is even more detailed in chronicling the lies Microsoft has been spreading around the web in order to win mindshare against open source software.
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
May 17th, 2006

Microsoft At It Again: On the Art (?) of Disinformation–Telling the Big Lie

Consortiuminfo.org - On the Art (?) of Disinformation: telling the Big Lie Here's a guy who sounds as fed up by Microsoft's continual disinformation tactics as I am. He's making the same argument I have made to family and friends for awhile now... namely, that Microsoft really is using the propaganda tactics made famous in a little book from the 1920's called Mein Kampf. The "big lie" became a famous propaganda technique through its use by the Nazis in World War II. As Hitler explained in Mein Kampf,
in the big lie there is always a certain force of credibility; because the broad masses of a nation are always more easily corrupted in the deeper strata of their emotional nature than consciously or voluntarily; and thus in the primitive simplicity of their minds they more readily fall victims to the big lie than the small lie, since they themselves often tell small lies in little matters but would be ashamed to resort to large-scale falsehoods. It would never come into their heads to fabricate colossal untruths, and they would not believe that others could have the impudence to distort the truth so infamously.

I have felt for a long time now that Microsoft has, either consciously or unconsciously, adopted the Big Lie tactic as standard operating procedure in its business competition, and distressingly it seems to have paid off for them. Many Microsoft fans are fans merely by virtue of Microsoft's success rather than because of the value of Microsoft's contribution to computing, and they, like Hitler's masses, simply will not believe anyone who tells them that the company has lied about anything important.

This article pertains to Microsoft's latest series of Big Lies about the open source "movement," which the company rightly recognizes to be a major threat to its dominance. Microsoft is a company that will not hesitate to lie about anything in order to win a battle, and it seems that the bigger the lie, the better. This is nothing new, of course. Microsoft told so many lies just during its antitrust trial that it would be an interesting project to document them.

Perhaps if enough people like this blogger from Consortiuminfo.org take the time to call Microsoft on its lies, some Microsoft fans will start to think twice about their blind allegiance to the company and begin recognizing lies when they occur.

    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
May 6th, 2006

Dave Winer Has Been Bad Again, and Les Posen’s Hunting Him Down!

Les Posen: Dave Winer says Apple owns my ass with its siloing of data. No, Dave, cut out the FUD and get some lessons in clear thinking. Good grief... in Dave Winer we appear to have another Rob Enderle or Paul Thurrott in the making... in reverse! What's with this guy? If he really feels this way, why not jump ship already? The sad and irritating thing is the amount of FUD he is spreading with his nasty, anti-Apple attitude.
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
May 3rd, 2006

MacDailyNews: A Banner Day for Anti-Apple FUD

MacDailyNews reports yet another FUD report from an Apple Hater This one is truly remarkable in its gall. I'm not even going to read the source article to avoid giving the creep hits. The author, writing for TVPredictions.com, cites no evidence other than his opinion for a variety of silly negative statements about Apple's very successful video iPod. (Which isn't really the "video iPod," you understand.)
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
May 3rd, 2006

John Gruber Shreds the Bogus, Viral “Mac Virus” Reporting

Daring Fireball: Good Journalism Always good to see John Gruber go after the bad guys. He does it so well! Here, he takes apart an AP report that tried to show some "trend" out of a single report picked up by various outlets. Good grief. Thanks, John!
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
May 3rd, 2006

Rob Enderle Revs Up the FUD

MacDailyNews: Enderle: If Apple can't double market share it will abandon Macs I know this pile of stupid Enderle "analyses" will come in useful one day. Otherwise, it would be heading straight to the toilet.
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
May 1st, 2006

A Seattle Tech Writer Exposes Mac Ignorance

Dan Goodin: Macs are virus targets, some experts warn It's articles like this that make me say nasty things like "Windows users are stupid." Where do guys like this come off acting like they know what they're talking about? MacDailyNews has a good lampoon of a few mis-facts here.
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
April 26th, 2006

PC Magazine’s Dvorak Proclaims IE To Be “The Great Microsoft Blunder”

Column from PC Magazine: The Great Microsoft Blunder Very interesting how our good friend Paul Thurrott--another traditional anti-Apple, pro-Microsoft bigot--have both come to the same conclusion this month. Here's what Thurrott had to say on this subject in a recent column:
Despite [its] enviable assets, Microsoft has made some mind-numbing mistakes. It (illegally, as it turns out) artificially bundled its immature Internet Explorer (IE) Web browser so deeply into Windows in order to harm Netscape that it's still paying the price for the decision--a full decade later--in the form of regular critical security flaws that have taken away time from developers that might have otherwise been spent innovating new features.

I always suspected these guys drank the same cool-aid, and just because they've finally realized the truth--which many of us realized back when it was happening--doesn't make them smart. It only reveals how bad they are at providing insight and understanding about the PC market and its players. Do they think this will make us trust their current prognostications? Hopefully, taking their blinders off will let more readers see them for what they really are: Microsoft apologists and cheerleaders, period.

    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
April 26th, 2006

MacDailyNews Shreds Columnist Who Perpetuates Myth That Apples Are Pricier Than Dells

MacDailyNews: Confused columnist on Apple's 17" MacBook Pro: 'you can get a couple of decent Dells' for that price As the MacDailyNews writer correctly points out, a comparable Dell would cost over $4,000 instead of the Apple's $2,999, and even then you wouldn't have a machine nearly as good as the MacBook. Great read.
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
April 18th, 2006

TUAW Isolates Another Bizarrely Dim Windows Cretin

Uninformed opinion: Boot Camp is Lame - The Unofficial Apple Weblog (TUAW) The comments to this article suggest the author intended his piece as a parody. If so, it's hard for me to understand the humor. Entitled Boot Camp Crashes and Burns, the article is so full of obviously false information it's either (a) outlandish anti-Apple FUD, (b) outrageous demonstration of stupidity by a college student, or (c) a pathetically lame attempt at parody. I hate to give the guy any hits, since none of the above options makes it worth reading, but if you want to form your own opinion you'll have to read it for yourself.
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
April 15th, 2006

MacDailyNews: USA Today’s Kantor Embarrasses Himself Yet Again

Andrew Kantor at USA Today: More Anti-Macintosh Drivel Kantor the IdiotWhere do guys like this get qualified to write about the Mac? As MacDailyNews reports, he recently raved about the Ken Burns effect which Microsoft finally added to their iPhoto clone, thinking it was something new and innovative. Good grief! And here he thinks his opinion about the effect of Boot Camp on the Windows/Mac markets will be influential with any thinking tech readers? No, he's just adding more embarrassing quotes to his long, sad, pro-Windows resume. I'm reporting on it here for completeness, and to recommend MacDailyNews' usual excellent rebuttal, not to give Mr. Kantor any more hits (unless you're nearby and want to sock him one for me!)
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
March 26th, 2006

San Francisco Chronicle Writer Proves Himself An Idiot Technology Analyst

Dan Frost Hasn't Done His Homework: Still Thinks the iPod Will Suffer Same Market-Share Fate as Macintosh If this were 2004, he might still be forgiven. But in 2006, this is just propaganda or wishful thinking. MacDailyNews does an excellent job, as usual, of explaining why.
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
March 26th, 2006

MacDailyNews: Another Day, Another (Wrong-Headed) Mac Market Overview

MacDailyNews Takes Issue With A Mercury News Mac "Market Share" Article The whole article isn't as bad as most, but as always, there are incorrect market share numbers, and a PC-User's wrong-headed perspective on what makes the Mac market tick.
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
March 21st, 2006

Vista and the Quest for More Memory

How Much RAM Will Vista Actually Require? More, probably. Apple and OS X have made a rich graphical interface look easy. Of course, it's tough to beat Quartz as the basis for your graphics engine. Microsoft is finding it's not as easy to copy as they thought, I suspect.
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
March 12th, 2006

Firefox Whips Internet Explorer In Vulnerability Tally

From Yahoo News: Symantec Rethinks Firefox vs IE Security, Using Its Brain This Time I wasn't the only one who was incredulous when Symantec gave the security edge to IE in a study they released last year. Now, it seems that some in Symantec were not pleased, either. That study was driven more by vendor payments than objective analysis, unlike the new one, which clearly gives the edge to Firefox. Symantec isn't the only company that really needs to worry about its credibility when accepting money from a vendor for doing analysis. The sham results we see so often make it impossible to engage in reasonable debate on matters like this... and reasonable debates on OS security, ROI, usability, and much more are very much needed nowadays!
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
March 6th, 2006

Univ. of Wisconsin Issues Mac OS X Security Challenge

Attacking the Misleading ZDnet article, Wisconsin U Has Issued a Mac OS X Security Challenge The ZDnet article was (deliberately?) misleading, claiming that Mac OS X had been hacked in under 30 minutes... Oh, and by the way, the person who "hacked" it was granted access with a local account! Duh. Really fair, wasn't it? So some smart folks at the University of Wisconsin have issued an honest challenge in response: Alter the web page on test.doit.wisc.edu, which is a Mac mini running OSX 10.4.5. I like that one!
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
February 4th, 2006

Yahoo! News Thinks Apple Represents the “Dark Side”!?

Joining the Dark Side: Switching to iPod - Yahoo! News Um, I'm happy for Mr. Cross that he's finally making a sensible decision. It's the same sensible decision that Windows users should be making. Apple just does computers and computing devices like the iPod better than anyone else. But why in the world does he think Apple is the "dark side"? I haven't read this yet, but I suspect he's one of those who mistakenly thinks Microsoft solutions are more "open" than Apple's, just because Microsoft lets other manufacturers do the hardware part. That's total b*llsh*t, of course, but you only realize that once you actually think about it rather than buying Microsoft's FUD hook, line, and sinker.
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
January 31st, 2006

Jobs Demonized By Wired

MacSlash | Jobs Demonized By Wired This has got to be the stupidest bit of anti-Apple misreporting I've heard about in some time. Bill Gates is the better man because he publicly gives a lot of his money to charity, and Steve Jobs doesn't. If you're interested, read the article. Otherwise, it's heartening to read the MacSlash readers opinions, most of which amount to a scathing put-down to Wired and Gates and a hearty defense of Jobs.
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
January 27th, 2006

Ancient flaws leave OS X vulnerable?

Ancient flaws leave OS X vulnerable?: ZDNet Australia: News: Security I'm not sure what to make of this... It comes from a credible source, a security consulting firm called Suresec. However, I'm inclined to agree with many of the commentators on the ZDNet website, who charge the writer with a kind of blackmail against Apple. After all, they're in the business to make money by finding security vulnerabilities. Apparently, Apple declined to pay for their services, and they're miffed. The whole security industry is suspicious, in my opinion. They exist because of vulnerabilities in Windows and now they want to extend their "market" to Mac OS X as well. Hmmm.
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
January 26th, 2006

A Policy of Neutrality(?!?), for Now, In the Music Gadget Wars

A Policy of Neutrality, for Now, In the Music Gadget Wars A story on the front page of today's Business section of the Washington Post deserves some attention. The writer claims a "neutral" stance on the "digital format wars," but her real issue is a distaste for getting locked in to Apple's iPod-iTunes solution. She's waiting for something that implements Microsoft's format in a package she likes. This is neutrality? Here's another person writing on technology issues that needs to be hung up to dry for not gathering all the facts.
    
  • del.icio.us
  • Google
  • Slashdot
  • Technorati
  • blogmarks
  • Tumblr
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
Just Say No To Flash